AOGS Small Satellite Payload Task Group: S2PTG

See You Again AOGS2014 in Sapporo

Geoscience using nano/micro satellite constellation

We expect that task oriented constellation of Nano/Micro satellites would provide the community of space sciences with opportunities which have not been possible with large scale missions. One good example is the QB50 project which is currently under development for the study of the lower thermosphere. With a network of about 40 double CubeSats, QB50 is to make multi-point, in-situ measurements of the key ionospheric/thermospheric parameters to understand the temporal and spatial variations of the least explored layer of the atmosphere. On the other hand, such constellation missions require participation from many institutions and countries for cost reduction as well as good coordination for efficient management of the program. The session is expected to provide an opportunity to discuss all aspects of the mission, from scientific goals that attract common interest such as earthquake predictions to candidate instruments as well as satellite systems, and to mission scenarios and data acquisition schemes including ground facilities. We will also discuss possible ways to materialize the proposed mission through collaboration of many countries in the region. We encourage submission of papers from both science and engineering sides. Contributions are also invited covering constellation missions under development and future mission concepts.
Lloyds Market Magazine Spring 2014
Scientists can identify earthquake signatures from electromagnetic and thermal activity prior to a major event. And they are now working to develop that understanding into a predictive capability. The UK and Russia, for example, are partnering on a joint initiative that will send satellites into orbit to monitor changes in electromagnetic activity - and hopefully enable scientists to pinpoint the location and time of a strike.
Dhiren Kataria, Head of In-situ Detection Systems at UCL°«s Mullard Space Science Laboratory, explains the technology behind the TwinSat Project: °»During the earthquake preparation phase, there are a number of things happening on the surface of the earth that propel electromagnetic signals into the environment. You can catch these signals using plasma sensors and electromagnetic field sensors from space with the advantage that satellites provide global coverage as opposed to ground-based sensors.°…
The challenge is then to isolate this data from similar signatures created by solar storms and human activity, and develop a communications network that can issue effective warnings to areas at risk throughout the world. The goal is to predict an earthquake with a magnitude upwards of six, hours and even days before it happens. However, says Kataria: °»In order to build that capability and not make false predictions, there is a considerable amount of work to be done.°…
Josaphat Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (JMRSL)

The 5th Nano-Satellite Symposium



Canadian satellite blasts off on mission to study space weather
Ivan Semeniuk - Science reporter
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 29 2013, 12:47 PM EDT

Seventeen years after he first proposed the idea, Andrew Yau is finally getting a front-row seat to one of the nearest yet least understood parts of outer space - the part that starts where Earth's atmosphere ends.

The University of Calgary physicist is project scientist for CASSIOPE, Canada's latest space mission, which was successfully launched Sunday atop a rocket built by the private company Space X.

"So far so good," said Dr. Yau. "I'm definitely excited and relieved. Now the real work begins."

For Dr. Yau and his colleagues, the real work involves a detailed exploration of ionosphere, an ephemeral realm of electric currents, magnetic fields and energized particles that intimately connects our planet to the interplanetary space environment that is dominated by our sun.

The Symposium on Microsatellites for Remote Sensing: SOMIRES 2013

Recently, some research, academic and commercial institutions in the world are developing microsatellites and mission payloads. Center for Environmental Remote Sensing (CEReS), Chiba University collaborates with domestic and overseas institutions, is also developing microsatellites and other platforms for remote sensing observation, especially ionosphere and global land deformation. The 20th CEReS International Symposium or The Symposium on Microsatellites for Remote Sensing (SOMIRES 2013) is kick-off event of our microsatellite project and co-organized by Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Kyoto University (The 231th Symposium on Sustainable Humanophere): The International Workshop on GPS Radio Occultation Mission with a Microsatellite. This symposium will provide an opportunity for researchers and system engineers to discuss new and viable technical topics of microsatellites, payload and spaceborne system, missions, analysis technique and applications for remote sensing. This symposium is organized and sponsored by Center for Environmental Remote Sensing (CEReS) - Chiba University, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH) - Kyoto University, Japan and Department Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Korea.


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Dear Distinguished Scientists and Engineers

The WG "Small Satellite Payload Task Group" has been authorized by AOGS. The session ST 12 "Geoscience using nano/micro satellite constellation" is planned at 16:00-18:00 on 27 June at room P7. On the same day during lunch time, kick off meeting will be held at the same place (WG-ST12). Everyone is welcome. Those who are planning to attend the kick off meeting, please prepare the lunch by yourself. Any question on the task group can be addressed to T. Kodama (secretary of the task group)

ST12 - Browse Abstracts: Oral/Poster Presentations


The purpose of the task group is summarized below.

We expect that task oriented constellation of Nano/Micro satellites would provide the community of space sciences with opportunities which have not been possible with large scale missions. One good example is the QB50 project which is currently under development for the study of the lower thermosphere. With a network of about 40 double CubeSats, QB50 is to make multi-point, in-situ measurements of the key ionospheric/thermospheric parameters to understand the temporal and spatial variations of the least explored layer of the atmosphere.
On the other hand, such constellation missions require participation from many institutions and countries for cost reduction as well as good coordination for efficient management of the program. The task group is expected to provide an opportunity to discuss all aspects of the mission, from scientific goals that attract common interest such as earthquake predictions to candidate instruments as well as satellite systems, and to mission scenarios and data acquisition schemes including ground facilities.
We will also discuss possible ways to materialize the proposed mission through collaboration of many countries in the region. We encourage submission of papers from both science and engineering sides. Contributions are also invited covering constellation missions under development and future mission concepts.

Session convener

*Prof. Koichiro Oyama (National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan) koh_ichiro@yahoo.co.jp
Dr. Wing-Huen Ip (National Central University, Taiwan) wingip@astro.ncu.edu.tw
Prof. Kyoung Min (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, South) kwmin@kaist.ac.kr
Mr. Ludmil Bankov (Space Research and Technology Institute, Bulgaria) ludmil.bankov@gmail.com
Dr. Borra Reddy (CSIR, India) borramreddy@rediffmail.com
Mr. Tetsuya Kodama (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Japan) kodama.tetsuya@jaxa.jp
Dr. Dhiren Kataria (Mullard Space Science Laboratory, United Kingdom) dokataria@gmail.com

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