After some time, I heard a shouting "Hello!  A train is coming this way!"  Someone yelled people a warning to get away from the rail track to avoid the train.  However, there were many who were still lying like the dead, unable to move on their own.


When the permission was given to all to get on board, everyone realized it was not like getting on board at the railway station platform.  The steps were so high from the ground that we had to climb up onto them.  While climbing, I rubbed my badly burnt chest twice on the edge of the step.  It didn't feel painful at all at that time, though.


Thus I got on the train deck and could see every seat was occupied by seriously injured victims.  They actually were not sitting, but rather had fallen over the seats.  And the corridor was all covered with dirt and blood.


Before long, the train started to move slowly.  I could hardly keep standing, so I finally sat down on the corridor floor, amid the dirt and the blood.

Soon I felt so weak that I fell down on my face, at which time I felt warm blood stuck on my lips.  The taste of blood is still vivid in my memory.


Relief train in the Nagasaki countryside.  Near Michinoo Station. Painting by Syouichi Fukahori / Courtesy of Nagasaki Prefecture radiation victim's pocketbook club  Relief train in the Nagasaki countryside. Painting by Syouichi Fukahori / Courtesy of Nagasaki Prefecture radiation victim's pocketbook club  
Both the painter and the speaker are survivors.

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