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Research

 

Project

TwinkleBall

2008~

Researcher

Supervisor

Tomoyuki Yamaguchi

Prof. Shuji Hashimoto

 

 

 

TwinkleBall is a ball-shaped interface for embodied sound media. The sound is generated by grasping force and human motion. The sounds generated by the traditional digital musical instruments are dependent on the physical shape of the musical instruments. The freedom of the musical performance is restricted by its structure. Therefore, the sounds cannot be generated with the body expression like the dance. We developed a ball-shaped interface, TwinkleBall, to achieve the free-style performance. The mechanism of TwinkleBall is as follows: 1) a photo sensor is embedded in the translucent rubber ball to detect the grasping force which is translated into the luminance intensity for processing, 2) an accelerometer is also embedded in the interface for motion sensing. By using these sensors, performer can control the note and tempo by varying grasping force and motion respectively. The features of TwinkleBall are luminous, ball-shaped, wireless, and handheld size. As a result, TwinkleBall is able to generate the sound from the body expression such as dance.

 

 

T. Yamaguchi, T. Kobayashi, A. Ariga, S. Hashimoto, gTwinkleBall: A Wireless Musical Interface for Embodied Sound Media,h Proc. of New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2010), pp.116-119, Australia, Jun. 2010.

T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gGrasping Interface with Photo Sensor for a Musical Instrument,h Proc. of the 13th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (HCI International 2009), pp. 542–547, USA, Jul., 2009.

 

 

Project

AttractiveEye

2008~

Researcher

Supervisor

Tomoyuki Yamaguchi

Prof. Shuji Hashimoto

 

 

 

AttractiveEye is a unique robotic eye which can be used to determine the focal object that a robot is looking at. Humans have the visual input mechanism but do not have the output mechanism concerning the visual signal except gestures. AttractiveEye can communicate information regarding the color of an object by changing its color to match that of the object. From the color of this robot, we can determine the focal object that it is looking at. The structure of AttractiveEye is quite simple by consisting of luminous devices and a camera sensor. Through the human-robot interaction experiment, we confirmed that human-robot interaction can be made easier by using AttractiveEye.

 

 

T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gAttractiveEye: Augmented Gaze Representation for gWhat is the robot looking at?hh, Proc. of IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2009), pp.2289-2294, Japan, May 2009.

 

 

Project

Ultra Fine Visual Inspection System on the Concrete Surface

1998~

Researcher

Supervisor

Tomoyuki Yamaguchi

Prof. Shuji Hashimoto

 

 

 

As a diagnostic application of automated image analysis, crack inspection using image processing and image measurement is proposed. During maintenance and diagnosis of concrete surfaces, crack inspection on the surfaces is important to ensure the safety of these structures. The crack width is a particularly important parameter used to evaluate the durability and degradation of concrete surfaces. Although many applications and systems have been developed for crack inspection, it is not easy to use these systems to measure crack width accurately in practical use. We developed automatic crack detection and crack measurement methods. In order to measure the crack width in exact scale, we fix a crack scale on the concrete surface, which is anchored on a photographable plate. By performed experiments on a real concrete surface, we evaluated the performance of the system and validate its reliability in practical use.

 

 

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gFast crack detection method for large-size concrete surface images using percolation-based image processing,h Machine Vision and Applications, Feb. 2009.

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Nakamura, R. Saegusa, S. Hashimoto, gImage-based crack detection for real concrete surfaceh, IEEJ Transactions on Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Vol.3, No.1, pp.128-135, Jan. 2008.

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, "Practical image measurement of crack width for real concrete structure," Electronics and Communications in Japan, vol.92 Iss.10, pp.1-12, Sep. 2009.

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gImage processing based on percolation model,h IEICE Transactions on Information and Systems, Vol.E89-D, No.7, pp.2044-2052, Jul. 2006.

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gAccurate Crack Inspection on Concrete Structure Surface Images,h Proc. of the 10th International Conference on Structural Safety and Reliability (ICOSSAR2009), pp.710-716, Japan, Sep., 2009.

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gImproved Percolation-based Method for Crack Detection in Concrete Surface Images,h Proc. of the 19th International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR2008), CD-Proc., pp.1-4, USA, Dec. 2008.

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Nakamura, S. Hashimoto, gAn efficient crack detection method using percolation-based image processing,h Proc. of IEEE Conf. on Industrial Electronics and Applications (ICIEA2008), Vol.3, pp.1875-1880, Singapore, Jun. 2008.

E  T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gAutomated crack detection for concrete surface image using percolation model and edge information,h Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society (IECON2006), CD-Proc., pp.3355-3360, France, Nov. 2006.

E  T. Yamaguchi, K. Suzuki, P. Hartono, S. Hashimoto, gPercolation approach to Image-based crack detection,h Proceedings of the 7th international conference on Quality Control by Artificial Vision (QCAV2005), pp.291-296, Japan, May 2005.

 

 

Project

SIEN

2007~

Researcher

Supervisor

Tomoyuki Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki Sorioka

Prof. Shuji Hashimoto

 

 

 

SIEN represents a novel safety measure concept in making climbing service robots feasible, e.g., in keeping them from falling off a wall due to concavity, convexity, or insufficient adhesion. The wall climbing-support robot SIEN we developed uses a telescopic arm to support itself. The arm has a joint with sensors to detect robot speed and direction of movement. SIEN follows and supports the climbing robot based on feedback using detected force. SIEN enabled the robot to climb walls reliably and safely, as confirmed in experimental results.

 

 

E  T. Yamaguchi, Y. Sorioka, S. Paku, S. Hashimoto, "SIEN: Telescopic-Arm Climbing-Support Robot," Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics, vol.21, no.5, pp.621-627, Nov. 2009.

E  Y. Sorioka, T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gDevelopment of a Telescopic-Arm Type, Climbing Support Robot,h Proc. of IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO2008), pp.1818-1823, Thailand, Dec. 2008.

 

 

 

Project

GoStuck

2010~

Researcher

Supervisor

Anna Ariga, Tomoyuki Yamaguchi

Prof. Shuji Hashimoto

 

 

 

GoStuck represents a wall-climbing robot for a narrow space that is not accessible for humans, such as a sewer pipe and small gaps between buildings. The proposed robot consists of two driving parts and a pantagraph between them that generates a pushing force against the walls to prevent the robot from falling down. Two different kinds of springs are installed on the pantograph in order to provide certain amount of the pushing force. The proposed mechanism can passively adapt to the changes in the interwall distance with a constant pushing force to achieve a smooth movement.

 

 

E   A. Ariga, T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gPassively Adaptable Wall Climbing Robot in Narrow Space,h Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics, vol. 23, No. 6, pp.1055-1065, Dec. 2011.

E  A. Ariga, T. Kobayashi, T. Yamaguchi, S. Hashimoto, gWall Climbing Robot in Narrow Space with Pantograph-type Structure,h Proc. of IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO2010), pp.1507-1512, China, Dec. 2010.

 

 

 

Project

Green Battery

2011

Researcher

Supervisor

Tomoyuki Yamaguchi

Prof. Shuji Hashimoto

 

 

 

When the metal electrode is inserted to the part of plant, and then the other metal electrode is put in the soil, the electrical potential difference generates between the two electrodes. The plant has a lower potential than the soil. The generated voltage from the electrical potential difference between one plant and the adjacent soil becomes small as several hundred mV, and the current is extremely low as several hundred nA. However, in order to boot up some electrical circuits, the voltage and current need V and A order, respectively. If the electrical potential difference between one plant and the soil is used to power supply, it is necessary to develop the nanoscale electrical device which can work with extremely low wattage. Here we report a novel green battery composed of 10 pot plants by serial-parallel connections. The developed battery can generate almost 3V and 3A to drive the electric devices. We designed the LED blinking circuit composed of discrete semiconductor parts which is driven by the generated plants power, and confirmed its performance through the experiments.   

 

 

E   T. Yamaguchi and S. Hashimoto, gA Green Battery by Pot Plants Power,h IEEJ Transactions on Electronics, Information and Systems, vol.7, no. 4, Jul. 2012(accepted for publication).

 

 

 

 

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contact: yamaguchi At akane.waseda.jp ( At means @, thanks)