CFRL English News No. 64       (2006. 3. 10)

Cold Fusion Research Laboratory (Japan) Dr. Hideo Kozima, Director

                            E-mail address; cf-lab.kozima@nifty.com

                                           hjrfq930@ybb.ne.jp

                            Websites; http://www.geocities.jp/hjrfq930/

                                     http://web.pdx.edu/~pdx00210/

            (Back numbers of this News are posted on the above Website)

 

   CFP (Cold Fusion Phenomenon) stands for gnuclear reactions and accompanying events occurring in solids with high densities of hydrogen isotopes (H and/or D) in ambient radiation.h

 

   This is the CFRL News (in English) No. 64 for Cold Fusion researchers published by Dr. H. Kozima, now at the Cold Fusion Research Laboratory, Shizuoka, Japan.

This issue contains following items:

1. Proc. ICCF10 was published.

2. Proc. ICCF11 was published.

3. A new neutron source in solids was proposed by Widom and Larsen.

 

1.     Proc. ICCF10 was published.

The Proceedings of ICCF10 held on August 2003 at Massachusetts, USA was finally published as follows.

Condensed Matter Nuclear Science, Proc. ICCF10, ed. P. Hagelstein and S. Chubb, World Scientific, Singapore, 2006 ISBN 981-256-564-7

The contents of this Proceedings is posted at the page of CFRL News No. 64. The Foreword by P. Hagelstein is posted at the page ICCF10 of CFRL Website;

http://www.geocities.jp/hjrfq930/Cfcom/Histry/ICCF/iccf10his.htm

 

2. Proc. ICCF11 was published.

The Proceedings of ICCF11 held on October – November 2004 at Marseilles, France was published soon after the publication of the Proc. ICCF10 as follows.

Condensed Matter Nuclear Science, Proc. ICCF11, ed. J.-P. Biberian, World Scientific, Singapore, 2006 ISBN 981-256-640-6

The contents of this Proceedings is posted at the page of CFRL News No. 64. The Foreword by J.-P. Biberian is posted at the page ICCF11 of CFRL Website;

http://www.geocities.jp/hjrfq930/Cfcom/Histry/ICCF/iccf11his.htm

 

3. A new neutron source in solids was proposed by Widom and Larsen.

 There are many ideas to explain the mechanism of the cold fusion phenomenon (CFP), a phenomenon belonging to Solid State-Nuclear Physics, or Condensed Matter Nuclear Science, including the one assuming the existence of neutrons in solids as Fisher and Kozima have enthusiastically pursued with success. The most serious problem of this approach was the origin of neutrons assumed beforehand to explain various events of the cold fusion phenomenon.

 In the case of Kozimafs TNCF model (Trapped Neutron Catalyzed Fusion model), the neutrons are assumed to be the thermal background neutrons trapped in solids and also neutrons bred by nuclear reactions between the trapped neutrons and nuclei in the solids.

 A new mechanism is proposed by Widom and Larsen in the paper cited below. This theory assumes the inverse reaction of neutron disintegration to a proton, an electron and an anti-neutrino in solids. It is good news to have a new mechanism to supply neutrons to catalyze nuclear reactions responsible for the CFP if this mechanism supplies enough neutrons to explain the cold fusion phenomenon.

 

A. Widom and L. Larsen, gUltra Low Momentum Neutron Catalyzed Nuclear Reactions on Metallic Hydride Surfacesh European Physics Journal C, DOI 10.1140 /epjc /s2006

-02479-8.

Summary

Ultra low momentum neutron catalyzed nuclear reactions in metallic hydride system surfaces are discussed. Weak interaction catalysis initially occurs when neutrons (along with neutrinos) are produced from the protons which capture "heavy" electrons. Surface electron masses are shifted upwards by localized condensed matter electromagnetic fields. Condensed matter quantum electrodynamic processes may also shift the densities of final states allowing an appreciable production of extremely low momentum neutrons which are thereby efficiently absorbed by nearby nuclei. No Coulomb barriers exist for the weak interaction neutron production or other resulting catalytic processes.

 

It is noticed that there is no reference to any paper in which neutrons are used to explain nuclear reactions in CFP. In our research history of 16 years in the field of CFP, we have accumulated a vast amount of experimental data sets and theoretical approaches which should not be forgotten. It is desirable that the authors of the above paper consider the theories of Fisher and Kozima with their relevant explanations of events in CFP even if their ideas of neutron production in solids is different.