CFRL English News No. 22 (2001. 3. 10)

@@@Cold Fusion Research Laboratory           Dr. Hideo Kozima

 

   This is CFRL News (in English) No. 22 translated from Japanese version published for friend researchers of Cold Fusion Research Laboratory directed by Dr. H. Kozima now at Portland State University. The e-mail address in PSU is <cf-lab.kozima@pdx.edu>

In this issue, there are following items.

1)   Abstracts of two papers in the process of acceptance for publication in Fusion Technology;

H. Kozima, gNeutron Bands in Metal Hydrides --- Effects of Occluded Hydrogen on Nuclear Reactions in Solidsh and

H. Kozima et al., gReality of ethe Super-nuclear Interactionf in Metal Hydrides and Deuterides --- Verification by Numerical Calculations for PdH (D).h

2)   On a paper where discussed impossibility of d-d fusion reaction,

3)   Program of Cold Fusion Session at APS March Meeting in Seattle.

4)   WN on APS Meeting.

 

 

1) Abstracts of two papers submitted to Fusion Technology:

H. Kozima, gNeutron Bands in Metal Hydrides --- Effects of Occluded Hydrogen on Nuclear Reactions in Solidsh Fusion Technology (submitted)

Abstract

The interaction between a neutron in a nucleus at a lattice point (in a lattice nucleus) and another neutron in another lattice nucleus through a proton (or deuteron) at an interstitial site between them is formulated. The interaction between neutrons through the interstitial protons (or deuterons) could be called the super-nuclear interaction for its long-range nature even if the strength is extremely small compared with neutron-neutron interaction by the nuclear force in a nucleus. If the neutrons are in an excited state of the nucleus with a wave function with larger orbits than that of the ground state, the interaction becomes considerable, making the excited states form a fairly wide band (a neutron valence band) similar to valence bands of electrons in semiconductors. Possible influences of the super-nuclear interaction on the nuclear reactions in solids are discussed.

 

H. Kozima, J. Warner, G. Goddard and J. Dash, gReality of ethe Super-nuclear Interactionf in Metal Hydrides and Deuterides --- Verification by Numerical Calculations for PdH (D)h Fusion Technology  (submitted)

Abstract

The interaction between adjacent metal nuclei mediated by interstitial protons (deuterons) in metal hydrides (deuterides) ("the super-nuclear interaction") proposed in our previous paper is verified by numerical calculations using information about a proton (deuteron) wave function given by a neutron scattering experiment. The proton (deuteron) is assumed to be trapped in a harmonic oscillator potential, which is calculated by the experimentally determined root-mean-square deviation from its equilibrium position. Differences in the interaction of protons and deuterons with the lattice and in the physics of other phenomena are discussed on the new basis obtained in this paper.

 

    In these two papers, quantum mechanical bases of the TNCF model are investigated with some semi-quantitative calculations. In addition to the success of the phenomenological approach by the TNCF model, now we are going to have quantum mechanical verifications of the bases of the model. After accomplishment of the work, we are in a standpoint from where CFP is investigated for further development and for application.

 

2) Papers gprovedh impossibility of Cold Fusion (d-d fusion reaction)

     I have experienced curious discussions recently several times.

     The d-d fusion reactions in solids was proposed in 1989 as a fundamental mechanisms for the cold fusion phenomenon (CFP), which at first supposed as consisted of the excess heat, neutron emission, tritium production and some others. Critics made calculations to show impossibility of d-d fusion in solids. Most well known works are those by Leggett and Baym (PRL 63, 191 (1989)) and by S. Ichimaru (RMP 65, 255 (1993)).

     . Then, the discussions I experienced go almost the same as follows. The d-d fusion reactions in solids are denied by rigorous calculation; therefore, cold fusion is impossible to occur in solids; any trial to explain existing experimental data, therefore, is a phantom at best.

     It is common to those discussions by critics who do not take care of experimental facts piled up in these twelve years. I do not understand such critics ignoring facts and relying only on the calculation (which is necessarily depending on assumptions made to make possible the calculation).

    It is interesting to read a passage from the paper by Ichimaru to know what he considered in making computation and writing the paper (From Introduction C (p. 258) of the paper cited above):

 gThe flurry of interest produced by the announcement of cold fusion rapidly polarized the scientific community into two groups: diehard enthusiasts and extreme skeptics. The initial experimental reports on power production through cold fusion have now been dismissed by almost everyone. However, it is important not to go to the extreme of rejecting all possibilities uncritically. Here we assess the fusion rates in metal hydrides I order to help provide an objective assessment of these possibilities (Leggett and Baym, 1989; Ichimaru, Ogata, and Nakano, 1990)h (Underlined at citation)

 

3) APS March Meeting at Seattle, March 12-16 http://www.aps.org/meet/MAR01

     March Meeting includes following fields:

Divisions: Condensed Matter Physics, Materials Physics, High Polymer Physics, Chemical Physics, Biological Physics, Fluid Dynamics, Laser Science and Computational Physics;

Topical Groups: Instrument and Measurement Science, Magnetism and Its Applications, Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, Statistical and Nonlinear Physics;

Forums: Industrial and Applied Physics, Physics and Society, History of Physics, International Physics, and Education and Physics.

The scale of this Meeting is just American (from eyes of present reporter from Japan).

 gAn outstanding scientific program will be presented consisting of more than 90 invited sessions and 550 contribute sessions at which approximately 5,000 papers will be presented. In addition, tutorials and workshops will be offered (see section on tutorials and workshops in this announcement.) (Underlined at citation)

     Cold Fusion Session is in Session V14 and each presentation has 12 minutes including discussion. Following is the Program of the Cold Fusion Session.

Session V14. DFD: Quantum Fluids and Solid IV: Cold Fusion.

Thursday morning, 08:00, Room 210, Washington State Convention Center

08:00 V14.001 Nuclear Reactions from a Many-Body D^+ Ion Band State

Talbot Chubb, Scott Chubb (Research Systems Inc., 5023 N. 38 St., Arlington, VA 22207)

08:12 V14.002 Concerning the Relationship Between Broken Gauge Symmetry, Pons-Fleischmann Anomalies and Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

Scott Chubb, Talbot Chubb (Research Systems Inc., 5023 N. 38 St., Arlington, VA 22207)

08:24 V14.003 The Measurement of Helium Isotopes to Demonstrate Solid State Nuclear Processes.

Michael C. H. McKubre, Francis L. Tanzella (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA), Paolo Tripodi, Vittorio Violante (ENEA, 00044 Frascati, Rome, Italy)

08:36 V14.004 Calorimetry of Pd +D Codeposition in a Fleischmann-Pons Dewar Cell

Melvin H. Miles (NHE Lab, 3-5 Techno-Park 2 - Chome Shimonopporo, Atsubetsu-Ku, Sapporo-004, Japan), Stanislaw Szpak, Pamela Mosier-Boss (Spawar, San Diego, California 92152), Martin Fleischmann (ENEA, 00044 Frascati, Rome, Italy)

08:48 V14.005 Dissipative tunneling of deuterons in Palladium Deuterides

K.P. Sinha, Peter Hagelstein (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Cambridge, MA 02139)

09:00 V14.006 Ways to Initiate a Nuclear Reaction in Solid Environments

E. K. Storms (Energy K. Systems, 2140 Paseo Ponderosa, Santa Fe, NM 87501)

09:12 V14.007 Helium Four Produced via Cavitation

R.S. Stringham (First Gate Energies, 2166 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043)

09:24 V14.008 Low Energy Nuclear Reactions Induced by Plasmon-Phonon Interaction in fcc Metal Lattice

Vittorio Violante, Paolo Tripodi (ENEA, 00044 Frascati, Rome, Italy), Michael C. H. McKubre, Francis L. Tanzella (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA), Daniele Di Gioacchino (INFN Frascati, Italy)

09:36 V14.009 Proposed Physical Mechanism to Account for the Kasagi Effect

Peter Hagelstein (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Cambridge, MA 02139)

09:48 V14.010 Plastic deformation in a strained palladium deuteride induced by anomalous neutron capture in an ultraweak thermalized neutron field

A.G. Lipson, S. Miyashita, N. Asami, E. I. Saunin, R. Shimada, T. Senju (Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 117915 Moscow, Russia)

10:00 V14.011 Anomalous Reaction Phenomena in Metals under High Proton Loading

G. H. Miley, C. Castano, M. Okuniewski, G. Selvaggi, A. Lipson (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Campus, 103 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 USA)

10:12 V14.012 How metallurgical and geometrical properties of the samples affect the low energy nuclear reactions in solids

Paolo Tripodi, Vittorio Violante (ENEA, 00044 Frascati, Rome, Italy), Michael C. H. McKubre, Francis L. Tanzella (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA), Daniele Di Gioacchino (INFN Frascati, Italy)

10:24 V14.013 Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: Status at the Beginning of the New Millenium Eugene F. Mallove (New Energy Research Laboratory, PO Box 2816, Concord, NH 03302-2816)

     It is interesting to notice in the Tutorials program to know APS about young researchers in the field covered in this Meeting.

Tutorials

T1 Mathematica Programming Fundamentals

T2 Electronic Polymers and Oligomers: Fundamentals and Applications

T3 MEMSh How to Make, Model and Use Microdevices in a Macro-world

T4 Sensitive Measurements

T5 Spintronics

T6 Single Molecule Imaging in Condensed Matter and Biology

T7 Putting Nanotubes to Work

T8 Opportunities for Applications of Physics in New Communications

 

    In the next item 4), I show what WN said about Cold Fusion Session at APS Meeting. This kind of discussion is similar to that introduced in the second item 2) above in this News. As scientists, we can learn from these discussions that we should be not like them.

 

4) WN, Friday, 8 December 2000 Washington, DC

1. COLD FUSION: THE "PALLADIUM BOMB" AND OTHER FANTASIES.

There are highly-classified intelligence warnings circulating among federal agencies that certain rogue nations are planning to use "cold fusion" to make a terrorist bomb. This comes from an old speculation by Martin Fleischmann, based on what he thought was going on in Pons' lab. But why now, years later? The answer lies in the intense PR campaign waged by believers to convey the impression that cold fusion has become respectable. Even "Science and Government Report," a Washington newsletter, writes: "Cold fusion may be wearing down opponents in the science mainstream." Well, not exactly. The newsletter cites the fact that the APS allows CF sessions at its meetings, but the APS has always accepted all contributed papers. This leads to some nutty sessions, but it's preferable to censorship. (Underlined at citation)

 

     Further, a recent issue of WN (2/23) wrote incorrect news reporting undecided case as if it was decided by gwriterfs intuitionh. We cite here only its title:

g2. COLD FUSION?  SUPREME COURT GIVES IT THE COLD SHOULDERh.

There was no evidence that the Supreme Court gave the cold shoulder, an investigator reported. This is an example of an unscientific thinking method of the writer of WN.